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Anonymous asked:

I love your blog ! But your profile picture irritate me. There is so many space between your arms if I would stand in front of you you would be dead

shaped-by-karate answered:

Thank you very much, I’m glad you like my blog!

I gotta say, though, I’ve never been complimented and killed in the same comment.

You clearly have no idea what I’m doing in the picture. I mean…

… and just so that the focus isn’t on movie stars.

… look at all that open space between their arms. Funakoshi (in last picture), specifically, used to fight from a relaxed position, and it always seemed like he had no guard at all. I’ve met a lot of people like that, too.

I take it you can kill all of them, too if you stood in front of them like that? 

It’s just a picture where I stopped in the middle of a movement to pose for the shot. It’s not a fighting stance. And even if it was, it’s still just a picture. 

Your comment shows a lack of maturity, my friend.

And forgive me for the exaggeration, but I’m slowly starting to believe that it’s the only way that people understand.

fightblr:

shaped-by-karate:

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Of course!

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rosalanfan62

It’s scares me that a good portion of the lady pics have them holding weapons haha.

^ Indeed xD

poeticsword410

poeticsword410:

ryusantiago:

poeticsword410:

ryusantiago:

poeticsword410:

building-an-unstoppable-fist:

shaped-by-karate:

road-to-fitness17:

manwithoutborders:

shaped-by-karate:

This is sports karate. Karate that does not work if you’re going to fight the way you do at a tournament. If you think sports karate is effective in a fight, no… just no.

And before somebody goes “but they’re noobies”…. notice that the boxers are noobies, too.

I entered a tourney… Came at the opponent like a boxer.. He didn’t know what to do. Threw done easily blockage strikes and i roundhouse the open ribs… Catches my kick and i counter his throw… Dislocating his collar bone.

Penalty.

He comes back and ends up winning on points in 4 minutes… But i had finished the fight in less than 15 seconds.

The only way “sport karate” would not work in a street fight is if you don’t understand the application. Notice hear in the video the person doing Karate is not padded up and avoiding face contact. Anyone of those round kicks to the chin and the boxer is out.
Point fighting evolved from the basis that the first technique will either end the fight, or inflict enough damage to wear you can get away.

That’s not what you learn in sports karate, though, as it can be clearly seen in the video… and what does it matter, the boxers still knocked them on their butts. They were fighting the way they were taught, light contact or no contact, karate for sport, and they are doing it, clearly, in a contact fight. You can’t go any dumber than that.

I’m not saying techniques are wrong, or that sports karate doesn’t teach application… it’s just that they train for competition, so a lot of these “martial artists” don’t really even know how to properly hit. They can strike hard, sure, but a lot of them don’t know how to apply it to have real stopping power.

And the reason why sports karate doesn’t work is because it’s for sport, nothing more than point sparring (talking about competition driven styles here). That’s why it’s called sports karate, it’s about speed, who touches the other first. They train like that for years and then “retire” out of the sport when they become a black belt. Those who stay end up teaching the same thing over and over, aerobics, punch, kick, punch, kick, this is how you go in and make a point, lets go to a competition.

Sure it takes time and dedication, it’s takes stamina and skill, but that, in no way, makes it effective. Against someone who knows nothing of fighting, maybe. Then again, someone who knows nothing about fighting gets angry and out of control, sports karateka gets confused, because “that’s not how you’re supposed to fight”.

In the end, as they get older, most lose all their ability to time, and say things like “wow, I miss my old dojo, maybe I’ll go back” but never do, or things like “Yeah, I got a black belt, but I retired” or they are always talking about how many “fights” they’ve won during their “career” and how they beat this black belt and that other black belt that supposedly are so good, but they won 5-0, but they don’t realize they only won, because of the competitions rules and regulations, speed and point sparring, not because they are good at fighting and applying techniques and power.

When people talk like that about karate, that’s not karate. They are doing a sport that simulates karate. A lot of great teachers have fallen into this type of commercialized karate and teach little to no karate at all. The only thing they keep alive is kata and even that is getting lost, by making them over the top flashy and absurd, losing completely it’s meaning. Not to mention the extreme martial arts, which took that even further into the “this makes no sense” realm, and still dare to call it karate.

I understand that things change, and all that, but just because “that’s how it’s done now” “evolution” “get with the times” and all that crap, doesn’t mean it’s the right way to go with karate.

All it’s doing is breeding more and more athletes that end up “retiring” before even understanding what martial arts are about, instead of forging and shaping their minds and bodies into martial artists.

^THIS

THIS TO THE NTHHHHH DEGREE

This irritates me…the boxer is skilled but where the fuck is a leg sweep a grab or a toss

It’s not allowed.

….not allowed if the boxer can use his full repertoire of moves so should the karateka be able to also .

I meant not allowed, because they are fighting like they would in a typical sports karate competition.

Ooooooo

=]

k-abysmal

k-abysmal:

shaped-by-karate:

stepnsteph:

shaped-by-karate:

manwithoutborders:

shaped-by-karate:

road-to-fitness17:

manwithoutborders:

shaped-by-karate:

This is sports karate. Karate that does not work if you’re going to fight the way you do at a tournament. If you think sports karate is effective in a fight, no… just no.

And before somebody goes “but they’re noobies”…. notice that the boxers are noobies, too.

I entered a tourney… Came at the opponent like a boxer.. He didn’t know what to do. Threw done easily blockage strikes and i roundhouse the open ribs… Catches my kick and i counter his throw… Dislocating his collar bone.

Penalty.

He comes back and ends up winning on points in 4 minutes… But i had finished the fight in less than 15 seconds.

The only way “sport karate” would not work in a street fight is if you don’t understand the application. Notice hear in the video the person doing Karate is not padded up and avoiding face contact. Anyone of those round kicks to the chin and the boxer is out.
Point fighting evolved from the basis that the first technique will either end the fight, or inflict enough damage to wear you can get away.

That’s not what you learn in sports karate, though, as it can be clearly seen in the video… and what does it matter, the boxers still knocked them on their butts. They were fighting the way they were taught, light contact or no contact, karate for sport, and they are doing it, clearly, in a contact fight. You can’t go any dumber than that.

I’m not saying techniques are wrong, or that sports karate doesn’t teach application… it’s just that they train for competition, so a lot of these “martial artists” don’t really even know how to properly hit. They can strike hard, sure, but a lot of them don’t know how to apply it to have real stopping power.

And the reason why sports karate doesn’t work is because it’s for sport, nothing more than point sparring (talking about competition driven styles here). That’s why it’s called sports karate, it’s about speed, who touches the other first. They train like that for years and then “retire” out of the sport when they become a black belt. Those who stay end up teaching the same thing over and over, aerobics, punch, kick, punch, kick, this is how you go in and make a point, lets go to a competition.

Sure it takes time and dedication, it’s takes stamina and skill, but that, in no way, makes it effective. Against someone who knows nothing of fighting, maybe. Then again, someone who knows nothing about fighting gets angry and out of control, sports karateka gets confused, because “that’s not how you’re supposed to fight”.

In the end, as they get older, most lose all their ability to time, and say things like “wow, I miss my old dojo, maybe I’ll go back” but never do, or things like “Yeah, I got a black belt, but I retired” or they are always talking about how many “fights” they’ve won during their “career” and how they beat this black belt and that other black belt that supposedly are so good, but they won 5-0, but they don’t realize they only won, because of the competitions rules and regulations, speed and point sparring, not because they are good at fighting and applying techniques and power.

When people talk like that about karate, that’s not karate. They are doing a sport that simulates karate. A lot of great teachers have fallen into this type of commercialized karate and teach little to no karate at all. The only thing they keep alive is kata and even that is getting lost, by making them over the top flashy and absurd, losing completely it’s meaning. Not to mention the extreme martial arts, which took that even further into the “this makes no sense” realm, and still dare to call it karate.

I understand that things change, and all that, but just because “that’s how it’s done now” “evolution” “get with the times” and all that crap, doesn’t mean it’s the right way to go with karate.

All it’s doing is breeding more and more athletes that end up “retiring” before even understanding what martial arts are about, instead of forging and shaping their minds and bodies into martial artists.

I’ve had the luxury of training in different schools, one that taught fundamentals and pounded them into you. The other teachers sport mainly (it does much on fundamentals too).

The big difference is time actually spent hitting something. In the first school, a third of the class was bag work. You learn how much your technique changes when you are trying to hit something… you overexert, you force, you over extend. You learn to strike the air in the same way that you would strike the bag/opponent. You roll your wrist from hitting wrong,  you stub your toes from bad positioning, you feel what its like to be hit through holding a bag. You learn to breathe with the strike. The worst thing about this approach is that you don’t really spar with someone because you are going all out, all the time.

My favorite thing in this class. “Was someone in this room faster than you? If so, then you are dead.”

The second school teaches how to score points and how to effectively get the first hit. The best thing is you learn how to see the opponent. The worst thing is that you never hit anything with intent…aside from some flashy kicks on a heavy bag… never a punch into a target. I disagree with the concept of two people striking at the same time and the faster person wins. In real life…both are dead. You just stabbed each other…only one faster. In real life the goal is to NOT get hit.

My favorite thing about this class. “Make them think they got you. Then get them.”

There needs to be a bit of both, but sport is missing the INTENT and fundamentals is missing the ESSENCE.  I like that I train in both.

You can still spar in karate, though. It’s pretty different, though, and to do it right, both need to have great control.

Missing the essence… you couldn’t have put it better. There is no “way of” in sports karate.

It’s as I / we always say, “You fight how you train”.

^ yup

here’s what i garnered from this clip: while im holding myself from hyper-analyzing this because it is rather redundant when they are in fact new students, i beg to differ that the primary reason the karate students lost was their lack of ability to deliver combos. whether you’re competing in a sparring tournament or caught yourself in a street fight, it is really foolish to believe that one move will be enough like “hAHA there’s my kick. now your turn!” no you gotta throw a combo of kicks and punches one after another in blitz speed to throw your opponent off balance and keep them guessing. 

i’ve sparred with a couple of boxers myself and fared well so i say that the best techniques against boxers would be combos and distance. i notice that in this video, they all spar in each other’s hot zone. let me tell you something, the hot zone is a boxer’s haven. boxers thrive in close proximity so i would fight and dance around the boxer farther away and then blitz with a series of moves in order to effectively bang hits and move as fast as out of there as you can.

You’re approaching this with the sports mentality, though. Get in, couple hits, get out. That’s they are doing in the video, successfully, too, until the boxers cut off their space after they realize that they aren’t doing any damage.

I didn’t say the lack the ability to make combos, but since you mention that, I’ll say that in a fight, yes, you want to be able to continue your attack and get out of danger if you need to, but there always that one power strike that is meant in incapacitate. In this case, the boxers hooks.

In Kempo, we teach that each attack comes in succession at different levels of speed and power, and aimed at different parts of the body, rather focusing on just the face or just the torso. But again, within that one attack composed of different strikes, there’s always the big power strike meant to be the incapacitating one.

In this video, if this guys had gone all out, they would’ve won. You see the boxers don’t even, or barely, attack until they realize they aren’t really getting hit. There was one kick in particular that would’ve sure dropped the boxer if it had simply been applied properly, with enough power.

becoming--batman

becoming—batman:

captainjaymerica:

shaped-by-karate:

namalam:

Myths and Misconceptions

10 Tall Tales of the Martial Arts Debunked!
by Jonathan Maberry

A Black Belt Is a Master
Not even close. A first-degree black belt is an advanced beginner. The belt signifies his passage from the ranks of those who are still learning to the ranks of those who’ve learned how to learn. That’s a significant difference.

The transition from white belt to black belt has less to do with techniques than with learning the methodology and procedures necessary to think like a martial artist. A black belt should be able to grasp the concepts on which the arts are based, which is far more important than his ability to perform any technique. There’s a saying about human survival: Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day, but teach a man to fish and you feed him for life. This is similar to the climb from colored belt to black belt: The black belt has learned how to learn and therefore becomes more proactive in his own education.

Does this mean he’s an expert? Well, my colleagues in the martial arts are evenly split on that point. One point of view is: Yes, a first-degree black belt is an expert on the basic gross motor skills necessary to perform martial arts moves. The other is: No, a first-degree black belt is not an expert but an advanced beginner who’s just grasping the concepts he’ll need to become an expert within a few years.

Most of the traditional instructors I know maintain that a person becomes a true expert by the time he reaches third degree, which is for many arts the point at which a person can begin teaching.

These days, first- and second-degree black belts are often assigned to teach, and many are even called sensei. This marketing tactic confuses the issue, especially when younger students learn to equate anyone with a black belt with instructor-level expertise.
I really like the idea of defining a first-degree black belt as an “advanced beginner”.  I read this article shortly before my test, and the truth of it resonates now that I’ve passed.

Very true. Attaining a black belt means nothing more than the fact that you know the basics.

This is why I find it ridiculous when people talk about being black belts, but “retiring”. Like there’s an end to it all.

You don’t retire from martial arts. It isn’t a job or a career; it’s a lifestyle.

indeed. when i got my black belt my sensei told me “now the real fun begins” and walked away laughing maniacally 

Hahaha, I know a few that would be scared out of their minds if our Sensei did that. xD